Alabama officials find spiked CBD products sold in the state

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File – In this Aug. 28, 2019, file photo, a man exhales while smoking an e-cigarette in Portland, Maine. The U.S. government has refined how it is measuring an outbreak of breathing illnesses in people who vape, now counting only cases that are most closely linked to electronic cigarette use. Health officials on Thursday, Sept. 12, 2019 said 380 confirmed cases and probable cases have been reported in 36 states and one U.S. territory. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty, File)

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — Alabama health officials had good reason when earlier this year they warned that products labeled as the cannabis extract CBD may not contain what they claim.

The state’s forensic scientists had identified dangerous synthetic marijuana in more than two dozen vapes or edible products marketed as CBD.

The Associated Press gathered the results for an investigation into how some operators are capitalizing on the CBD boom by substituting a cheap street drug for the real thing.

That practice has sent dozens of people nationwide to emergency rooms. Unlike real CBD, synthetic marijuana gives an intense high.

In all, lab testing shows spiked vape or edible CBD products such as gummy bears in at least 13 states.

Industry representatives acknowledge spiking is an issue, but say many companies are reputable.

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