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Alabama House legislators approve Ten Commandments bill

Supporters and opponents weigh in on efforts to display the Ten Commandments in schools and public places.
State Representative Steve Clouse discusses the House's desicion to approve the proposed Ten Commandments amendment.
State Representative Steve Clouse discusses the House's desicion to approve the proposed Ten Commandments amendment.
Dothan resident Mary Pugh hopes to see the proposed amendment to display the Ten Commandments ultimately written in stone.
Dothan resident Mary Pugh hopes to see the proposed amendment to display the Ten Commandments ultimately written in stone.
Dothan resident Leslie Kraut says displaying the Ten Commandments in public is a violation of the separation of church and state.
Dothan resident Leslie Kraut says displaying the Ten Commandments in public is a violation of the separation of church and state.

It's an issue of biblical proportions.

 

"Religion belongs in your home in your house of worship.  It doesn't belong smeared all over town or in public places," said Dothan resident Barbara Kraut.

 

"They should have the Ten Commandments everywhere in the United States.  We're going through hell and high water, and look at our children. They're just buck-wild and out of control,” Mary Pugh, another Dothan resident, said.  If they're not going to get it at home, they should be able to go into the library and anywhere else."

 

"We don't need it in this country.  Separation of state and church means separation of church and state.  If you want to uphold the constitution, you don't do this," Leslie Kraut said.

 

It’s a big part in the Red Sea of public opinion, between those who are for and against the bill. 


The Alabama House of Representatives approved a proposed constitutional amendment allowing the Ten Commandments to be displayed in schools and other public places.

 

"Well, I favor it.  I think that people need to see the historical significance of the Ten Commandments, as well as the other historical documents," said Steve Clouse (AL-R, Dist. 93).

 

Bill supporters say there's nothing wrong with simply displaying an ancient, religious text. 

 

"Even our founding fathers had references to the bible and to God, and of course this would be just that, a reference.  It would be with other historical documents, so it would not bridge church and state together."

 

There are Jewish, Catholic, Protestant and other versions of the Ten Commandments, and opponents of the bill say picking only one version will only cause more confusion in the schools.

 

"We think that it puts schools in jeopardy of running afoul of the United States Constitution," said Susan Watson, Executive Director of the Alabama American Civil Liberties Union.

 

They also aren't ruling out politics as a reason for the bill.

 

” I think it is an election year, and we've seen a number of bills that are probably there for political reasons."

 

It's now up to the Senate to decide of the bill will move forward.

 

If it passes, Alabama voters will decide its fate in November.

 


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